• Users Online: 322
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Contacts Reader Login
Export selected to
Endnote
Reference Manager
Procite
Medlars Format
RefWorks Format
BibTex Format
  Citation statistics : Table of Contents
   2009| September-October  | Volume 1 | Issue 2  
    Online since July 18, 2017

 
 
  Archives   Previous Issue   Next Issue   Most popular articles   Most cited articles
 
Hide all abstracts  Show selected abstracts  Export selected to
  Cited Viewed PDF
SPECIAL COMMUNICATION
Fasting during the month of ramadan for people with diabetes: Medicine and fiqh united at last
SA Beshyah
September-October 2009, 1(2):58-60
DOI:10.4103/1947-489X.211054  
Fasting during the lunar month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for all adult Moslems. Under certain circumstances, a few groups are exempt from fasting such as being “sick” as judged by an experienced doctor. Recent collaboration between the International Islamic Fiqh Academy and The Islamic Organization for Medical Sciences produced a comprehensive guidance based on extensive review of the evidence of possible risk to diabetic patients if they observe fasting. The new guidance categorized people with diabetes into 4 groups according to their risk. Group 1 and 2 are exempted from fasting as they have risk from fasting. These included patients with poor glycemic control or with complications and serious coexisting illnesses in addition to type 1 patients and pregnant women with diabetes. Patients in groups 3 and 4 are those with moderate to low risk of harm from fasting. These are exemplified by uncomplicated patients with stable control on oral drugs not associated with excess risk of hypoglycemia. These groups of patients have no harm but may even benefit from fasting. Doctors and religious scholars have a joint responsibility to properly assess and advise patients to choose to fast or not to fast in line with these recommendations. The advice should be Fasting during the lunar month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for all adult Moslems. Under certain circumstances, a few groups are exempt from fasting such as being “sick” as judged by an experienced doctor. Recent collaboration between the International Islamic Fiqh Academy and The Islamic Organization for Medical Sciences produced a comprehensive guidance based on extensive review of the evidence of possible risk to diabetic patients if they observe fasting. The new guidance categorized people with diabetes into 4 groups according to their risk. Group 1 and 2 are exempted from fasting as they have risk from fasting. These included patients with poor glycemic control or with complications and serious coexisting illnesses in addition to type 1 patients and pregnant women with diabetes. Patients in groups 3 and 4 are those with moderate to low risk of harm from fasting. These are exemplified by uncomplicated patients with stable control on oral drugs not associated with excess risk of hypoglycemia. These groups of patients have no harm but may even benefit from fasting. Doctors and religious scholars have a joint responsibility to properly assess and advise patients to choose to fast or not to fast in line with these recommendations. The advice should be given with no complacency with the potential health risks but with great sensitivity to the patients religious feelings.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF] [CITATIONS]
  38 708 216
CASE REPORT
Nephrotic syndrome with intracardiac thrombosis: A case report
Bahlul A Gurbanna, Aiman M Smer, Mohamed R Abdulmajid, Monder M Alhasadi, Hajer K Almosbahi, Hawa A Derbi, Nawras M Abuhamidah, Imhmed A Sassi
September-October 2009, 1(2):67-70
DOI:10.4103/1947-489X.211056  
Although thromboembolic events are well known complications of nephrotic syndrome, there are several unanswered questions relating to the nephrotic syndrome and thromboembolism such as the mechanism of thromboembolism and optimal diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. We report on a case of a 26 year-old female with nephrotic syndrome, intracardiac thrombi, and evidence of embolization to brain and spleen. Diagnostic evaluation revealed a patent foramen oval with intracardiac thrombi. Despite adequate anticoagulation therapy, the left ventricular thrombus embolized into the spleen. However, with continued anticoagulation the patient had a satisfactory recovery and was released from the hospital with minimal neurologic deficit.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF] [CITATIONS]
  1 399 37
EDITORIAL
New product of ibnosina medical association: IJMBS
Elmahdi A Elkhammas
September-October 2009, 1(2):44-45
DOI:10.4103/1947-489X.211052  
Full text not available  [PDF] [CITATIONS]
  1 216 57
MINIREVIEW
Effects of radiation: The paradigm shifts, adaptive response and bystander models
AC Ugwu, AO Imo, VC Ikamaise
September-October 2009, 1(2):61-66
DOI:10.4103/1947-489X.211055  
Evidence accumulated over the last 50 years shows that radiation also has indirect ‘non-target’ actions in which effects of radiation on cells or tissues are transported to cells or tissues that were not ‘hit’ by radiation, leading to changes in their function. Radiation- induced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects by the bystander effect is in contrast to the observations of the adaptive responses, which are generally induced following exposure to low dose, low linear energy transfer radiation and which tend to attenuate radiation – induced damage. In this paper the evidence of the radiation induced bystander effect and adaptive response are discussed. The implications of these non-targeted effects to radiotherapy and radiation protection practices are also highlighted.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]
  - 359 51
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Effectiveness of walking with pedometer and heart rate monitor on the quality of life and wellbeing in Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes
S Shenoy, R Guglani, JS Sandhu
September-October 2009, 1(2):46-57
DOI:10.4103/1947-489X.211053  
Introduction: The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of an eight week walking program using a pedometer and heart rate monitor (HRM) for evaluating exercise intensity compared with walking alone on quality of life and general wellbeing (GWB) in Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Forty adults with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to an eight week supervised program of walking alone (group A) and walking using pedometer and HRM (group B). A suitably designed and validated questionnaire was administered before and after eight weeks of training for all patients to assess the quality of life (ADDQoL-19) and general wellbeing (W-BQ12). Results: At the end of the study, quality of life and general wellbeing scores were found markedly improved in both the groups. In group A, a statistically significant reduction was noted for seven items and in group B a statistically significant reduction was seen in eleven items of the quality of life questionnaire. General wellbeing scores were improved in both groups by 26.2% in group A and 28.8% in group B (P<0.05). Conclusion: Walking using a pedometer and heart rate monitor for assessing exercise intensity and motivation was found more effective than walking alone in improving quality of life and general wellbeing for Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes.
[ABSTRACT]   Full text not available  [PDF]
  - 354 56