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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 184-192

Modulation of Parkinson's disease by the gut microbiota


1 Bachelor of Health Sciences Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
2 Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Prince Sultan Military College of Health Sciences, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
3 REA, King Khalid Medical City, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
4 Bachelor of Health Sciences Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; REA, King Khalid Medical City, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mahmood Akhtar
King Khalid Medical City, King Fahad Specialist Hospital-Dammam, Room 26, First Floor, Building 100, Ammar Bin Thabit Street, Al Muraikbat, Dammam

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmbs.ijmbs_68_18

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The gut microbiota consists of thousands of microbial species sharing a symbiotic relationship with the human host. These microorganisms have a well-defined role in maintaining optimal function through various avenues including metabolism and immunomodulation. A literature search was accomplished using Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PubMed, and relevant articles were nonsystematically reviewed. In states of dysregulation termed dysbiosis, the gut microbiota may play a role and can lead to various pathologies. Interestingly, pathological states are not entirely limited to the gut and have the potential to affect other systems. Notably, dysbiosis has been linked to several neurological pathologies, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Hallmarks of Parkinson's include buildup of Lewy bodies mediated by α-synucleinopathies, aggregation of misfolded proteins, and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in various motor and gastrointestinal dysfunctions. The gut microbiota is implicated in contributing to this pathology through communication via the gut–brain axis. While there have been preliminary findings indicating the potential for a causal role of the gut microbiota in PD, further research is required before making solid conclusions.


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