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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 125-129

Guillain–Barré syndrome in the United Arab Emirates: A sixteen-year experience of a single center


1 Internal Medicine Residency Program, Institute of Education, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
2 Division of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
3 Division of Endocrinology, Institute of Medicine, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anas S Beshyah
Internal Medicine Residency Program, Institute of Education, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, P. O. Box 59472, Abu Dhabi
United Arab Emirates
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmbs.ijmbs_44_18

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Background: Guillain–Barré Syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis. We describe clinical characteristics and outcomes of GBS in a region where data are hitherto limited. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. All GBS patients identified between 2000 and 2015 were documented and summarized using descriptive statistics. Results: Fifty-three patients were identified. GBS was 3.1 fold more common in men; median age was 33 (range: 16–79). 47.2% of the patients were previously healthy. Upper respiratory tract infections occurred in 37.7% and gastroenteritis in 18.9%. The most common clinical presentation was bilateral upper and lower limb weakness (47.2%). Vital capacity was low in 63.16% of patients. Classical albuminocytologic dissociation was seen in 19.5% of patients who had a lumbar puncture done. Nerve conduction studies were carried out in 56.6% of cases, and the most commonly observed abnormality was mixed axonal neuropathy. Nearly 60.38% of patients had adverse outcomes. Eight patients (25%) required admission to the intensive care of whom six required mechanical ventilated. Twenty-Four patients (75%) were discharged with residual motor weakness, and five of whom required further rehabilitation. Poor respiratory status on arrival significantly predicted poor outcome. Conclusions: Our results are generally similar to international trends in GBS. Respiratory dysfunction and decreased vital capacity were the only poor prognostic factors identified. Nerve conduction findings were not associated with clinical or prognostic values.


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