• Users Online: 250
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Contacts Login 
SPECIAL COMMUNICATION
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 58-60

Fasting during the month of ramadan for people with diabetes: Medicine and fiqh united at last


Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Correspondence Address:
S A Beshyah
Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi
United Arab Emirates
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-489X.211054

Rights and Permissions

Fasting during the lunar month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for all adult Moslems. Under certain circumstances, a few groups are exempt from fasting such as being “sick” as judged by an experienced doctor. Recent collaboration between the International Islamic Fiqh Academy and The Islamic Organization for Medical Sciences produced a comprehensive guidance based on extensive review of the evidence of possible risk to diabetic patients if they observe fasting. The new guidance categorized people with diabetes into 4 groups according to their risk. Group 1 and 2 are exempted from fasting as they have risk from fasting. These included patients with poor glycemic control or with complications and serious coexisting illnesses in addition to type 1 patients and pregnant women with diabetes. Patients in groups 3 and 4 are those with moderate to low risk of harm from fasting. These are exemplified by uncomplicated patients with stable control on oral drugs not associated with excess risk of hypoglycemia. These groups of patients have no harm but may even benefit from fasting. Doctors and religious scholars have a joint responsibility to properly assess and advise patients to choose to fast or not to fast in line with these recommendations. The advice should be Fasting during the lunar month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for all adult Moslems. Under certain circumstances, a few groups are exempt from fasting such as being “sick” as judged by an experienced doctor. Recent collaboration between the International Islamic Fiqh Academy and The Islamic Organization for Medical Sciences produced a comprehensive guidance based on extensive review of the evidence of possible risk to diabetic patients if they observe fasting. The new guidance categorized people with diabetes into 4 groups according to their risk. Group 1 and 2 are exempted from fasting as they have risk from fasting. These included patients with poor glycemic control or with complications and serious coexisting illnesses in addition to type 1 patients and pregnant women with diabetes. Patients in groups 3 and 4 are those with moderate to low risk of harm from fasting. These are exemplified by uncomplicated patients with stable control on oral drugs not associated with excess risk of hypoglycemia. These groups of patients have no harm but may even benefit from fasting. Doctors and religious scholars have a joint responsibility to properly assess and advise patients to choose to fast or not to fast in line with these recommendations. The advice should be given with no complacency with the potential health risks but with great sensitivity to the patients religious feelings.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed130    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded29    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 6    

Recommend this journal